A Scandinavian Weekend

iceland

About this time last year we were in Scandinavia, marveling at the light-filled nights and taking huge gulps of the bright clean fjord air of Norway. We’ve become massive Scandiphiles in the past few years, a process which has sort of happened organically. We find ourselves drawn to the culture, the landscape and most definitely the food of the North. If we didn’t live here in Wales, where we are very happy, I think we’d probably be somewhere in Scandinavia – probably Sweden.

norway

I usually delve into my Scandi cookery books around Autumn or Winter time, when I’m looking for comfort food. All those delicious carb-packed potato-y pancakes and sumptuous rice puddings with spiced fruits – yum. In the darker, colder months I look to our Northern cousins for culinary inspiration. They know how to look after themselves in style when it gets chilly. When all is dark outside, they somehow manage to entice light into their homes with candles and warmth comes in the form of good food and good company (not to mention a decent log fire). I love those photos of little red houses, nestled in a valley, throwing out tangerine squares of light in an otherwise darkened, snow-filled landscape.

But I digress.

It must have been something about recollecting last year’s holiday, or maybe it was that we’ve just recently got into watching the series The Killing (yeah, 7 years late! We’re doing it back to front – first it was Wallander, then the Bridge, now this) but this weekend I found myself picking out my Scandinavian cookery books from the bookshelf.

clytha

Trine Hahnemann is a bit of a guru on Scandinavian cookery and I don’t know why we don’t see her on television a bit more. Anyway, these recipes come courtesy of her book: The Scandinavian Cookbook. Lovely recipes and gorgeous photography to boot. On Saturday we ate fishcakes with remoulade and potatoes, and on Sunday we had barbecued leg of lamb with herb potato salad and a salad made with pointed cabbage, almonds and dill. Here we’ve shared the recipe for the fishcakes, the cabbage salad and the remoulade. All of these were cooked by Pete – I can take none of the credit. I just ate it.

scandi-bbq-lamb

Hannah

A tip: we found that the cabbage needs to be shredded quite finely for a good ‘mouth feel’ and it definitely benefits from sitting about a bit in the dressing.
The remoulade recipe specifically goes with the fish but it’s so yummy that you could easily boil some small salad potatoes and serve this up as a really tasty Scandi tapas!

Scandinavian Fishcakes

Scandinavian Fishcakes

Herb Remoulade

Herb Remoulade

Pointed cabbage with dill and peas

Pointed cabbage with dill and peas

Barbequed lamb with tarragon

Barbequed lamb with tarragon

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